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Sperb’s Herbs Ep. 5 – Dang Gui, Angelica

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Finally, an “A” lister: Dang Gui is definitely one of the all-stars of Chinese herbology. As a cornerstone of many formulas to help build the blood and affect the menses, it is one of the most important herbs in the Chinese pharmacopoeia. Join us as we explore this herb in its traditional context, in current western herbology, and the science behind it.

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Sperb’s Herbs Ep. 4 – Kava-Kava

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Kava-Kava, also known as just Kava, has very interesting herbal properties, but is also culturally very important as a medicine, an intoxicant,  and for religious, political, and social purposes. It’s pharmacology has been well studied. And it has been shown to have liver toxicities. Is this herb useful medicinally? Does its benefits outweigh its risks? Let’s find out…

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Sperbs Herbs Ep 3 – Sha Ren

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Shā Rén, one of the cardamoms, is one of my favorite herbs, for many reasons. Besides being one of the best tasting herbs, it’s actions speak to me by helping to treat dampness and strengthen the spleen. While not necessarily an “A” list herb, please join us as we explore it.


Approved for both California Acupuncture Board CEUs and NCCAOM PDAs!

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Sperbs Herbs Ep 2 – Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

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This one is personal: this is the formula I have been on for quite a while now. It lives up to its translation of “All Inclusive Great Tonifying Decoction.” It is kind of an all-purpose formula in that it tonifies all four of the basic substances: qi, blood, yin, and yang.

Coming Soon: World Herbs

WH2 – Ashwagandha Sept. 7, 2019

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Ashwagandha is one of the most important herbs in Ayurvedic Medicine. Sometimes referred to as “Indian ginseng” in the West, it is often referred to as an adaptogen, just like its Asian and American ginseng counterparts. In simple terms, this means it is used as a general tonic and the body “adapts” it to what it needs. While used for many conditions, the science seems a little iffy on its effectiveness. Let’s figure out if this is the case, or does there need to be more research or maybe more acceptance of its traditional uses.


Support Materials

Support materials such as links, bibliography, and any show notes will be posted here after the episode goes live. So please stay tuned…

Coming Soon: World Herbs

WH1 – Kava-Kava August 10, 2019

Posted on

Kava-Kava, also known as just Kava, has very interesting herbal properties, but is also culturally very important as a medicine, an intoxicant,  and for religious, political, and social purposes. It’s pharmacology has been well studied. And it has been shown to have liver toxicities. Is this herb useful medicinally? Does its benefits outweigh its risks? Let’s find out…


Support Materials

Support materials such as links, bibliography, and any show notes will be posted here after the episode goes live. So please stay tuned…

Coming Soon: Chinese Formulas

CF2 – Xiāo Yáo Sǎn August 24, 2019

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Xiāo Yáo Sǎn, translated as “Rambling Powder,” is one of the most widely used formulas in Chinese medicine. It gently harmonizes the Spleen and Liver and treats a wide variety of modern conditions. But is it always the best choice? Is it over-used by practitioners? Or is it the “wonder” formula? Let’s find out!


Support Materials

Support materials such as links, bibliography, and any show notes will be posted here after the episode goes live. So please stay tuned…

Chinese Formulas

CF1 – Shí Quán Dà Bŭ Tāng August 1, 2019

Posted on

This one is personal: this is the formula I have been on for quite a while now. It lives up to its translation of “All Inclusive Great Tonifying Decoction.” It is kind of an all-purpose formula in that it tonifies all four of the basic substances: qi, blood, yin, and yang.

Listen here:

CF1 – Shi Quan Da Bu Tang

Support Materials

Links

Clinical Review of Astragalus, Ligusticum, and Schizandrae

Explanation of Peyer’s patch

A Japanese Kampo overview of SQDBT

Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center overview of SQDBT

Scientific article on the use of SQDBT in malignancies

Bibliography

Kogure, T., Ltoh, K., Tatsumi, T., Sekiya, N., Sakai, S., Shimada, Y., Tamura, J., Terasawa, K. (2005, May). The effect of Juzen-taiho-to/TJ-48 on the expression of killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (CD158a/b) on peripheral lymphocytes in vitro experiment. Phytomedicine. 12(5), 327-32. Retrieved November 29, 2016 from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S094471130500019X.

Lau, C., Mooiman, K.D., Maas-Bakker, R.F., Beijnen, J.H., Schellens, J.H,, Meijerman, I. (2013, Sep 16). Effect of Chinese herbs on CYP3A4 activity and expression in vitro. J Ethnopharmacol. 149(2):543-9.

Liu, H., Wang, J., Sekiyama, A., Tabira, T. (2008). Juzen-taiho-to, an Herbal Medicine, Activates and Enhances Phagocytosis in Microglia/Macrophages. The Tohoku Journal of Experimental Medicine. 215(1), 43-54. Retrieved November 30, 2016 from https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/AF13S010Init.

Lo, A. C., Chan, K., Yeung, J. H., Woo, K. S. (1995, Jan-Mar). Danggui (Angelica sinensis) affects the pharmacodynamics but not the pharmacokinetics of warfarin in rabbits. Eur J Drug Metab Pharmacokinet. 20(1):55-60.

Mateo-Carrasco, H., Gálvez-Contreras, M.C., Fernández-Ginés, F.D., Nguyen, T.V. (2012). Elevated liver enzymes resulting from an interaction between raltegravir and panax ginseng: a case report and brief review. Drug Metabol Drug Interact. 27(3):171-5.

Ohnishi, Y., Fujii, H., Hayakawa, Y., Sakukawa, R., Yamaura, T., Sakamoto, T., Tsukada, K., Fujimaki, M., Nunome, S., Komatsu, Y. and Saiki, I. (1998). Oral Administration of a Kampo (Japanese Herbal) Medicine Juzen-taiho-to Inhibits Liver Metastasis of Colon 26-L5 Carcinoma Cells. Japanese Journal of Cancer Research, 89: 206–213. Retrieved December 28, 2016 from http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1349-7006.1998.tb00550.x/epdf.

Pao, L. H., Hu, O. Y., Fan, H. Y., Lin, C. C., Liu, L. C., Huang, P. W. (2012). Herb-drug interaction of 50 Chinese herbal medicines on CYP3A4 activity in vitro and in vivo. Am J Chin Med 40(1):57-73.

Qi, L. W., Wang, C. Z., Du, G. J., Zhang, Z. Y., Calway, T., Yuan, C. S. (2011, November 1). Metabolism of Ginseng and its Interactions with Drugs. Curr Drug Metab. 12(9): 818–822.

Scheid, V., Bensky, D., Ellis, A., Barolet, R. (2015). Chinese herbal medicine formulas & strategies (Portable 2nd Ed). Seattle, WA: Eastland Press, Inc.

Tatsuta, M., Iishi, H., Baba, M., Nakaizumi, A., Uehara, H. (1994). Inhibition by Shi-Quan-Da-Bu-Tang (TJ-48) of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis induced by N-nitrosomorpholine in sprague-dawley rats. European Journal of Cancer. 30(1), 74-78. Retrieved November 29, 2016 from http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095980490580022X.

Yi, S., Cho, J.Y., Lim, K.S., Kim, K.P., Kim, J., Kim, B.H., Hong, J.H., Jang, I.J., Shin, S.G., Yu, K.S. (2009, October). Effects of Angelicae tenuissima radix, Angelicae dahuricae radix and Scutellariae radix extracts on cytochrome P450 activities in healthy volunteers. Basic Clin Pharmacol Toxicol. 105(4):249-56. Retrieved December 18, 2013 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19422358?ordinalpos=1&itool=Email.EmailReport.Pubmed_ReportSelector.Pubmed_RVDocSum.

Zhang, Z. J., Tan, Q. R., Tong, Y., Wang, X. Y., Wang, H. H., Ho, L. M., Wong, H. K., Feng, Y. B., Wang, D., Ng, R., McAlonan, G. M., Wang, C. Y., Wong, V. T. (2011, February 16). An epidemiological study of concomitant use of Chinese medicine and antipsychotics in schizophrenic patients: implication for herb-drug interaction. PLoS One. 6(2). Retrieved January 7, 2014 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3040227/.

Coming Soon: Chinese Singles

CS3 – Dāng Guī (Angelica) August 17, 2019

Posted on

Finally, an “A” lister: Dang Gui is definitely one of the all-stars of Chinese herbology. As a cornerstone of many formulas to help build the blood and affect the menses, it is one of the most important herbs in the Chinese pharmacopoeia. Join us as we explore this herb in its traditional context, in current western herbology, and the science behind it.


Approved for both California Acupuncture Board CEUs and NCCAOM PDAs!

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Support Materials

Support materials such as links, bibliography, and any show notes will be posted here after the episode goes live. So please stay tuned…

Coming Soon: Chinese Singles

CS2 – Shā Rén (Amomum) August 3, 2019

Posted on

Shā Rén, one of the cardamoms, is one of my favorite herbs, for many reasons. Besides being one of the best tasting herbs, it’s actions speak to me by helping to treat dampness and strengthen the spleen. While not necessarily an “A” list herb, please join us as we explore it.


Approved for both California Acupuncture Board CEUs and NCCAOM PDAs!

Support Materials

Support materials such as links, bibliography, and any show notes will be posted here after the episode goes live. So please stay tuned…