Apple of Sodom (Calotropis)

This episode covers the herb Apple of Sodom or Calotropis procera. This herb is very interesting in that it has potentially biblical origins, is thought to be quite toxic, and yet has some interesting medicinal properties. Each episode of the podcast will go into great depth about a single herb or formula. Besides covering the basics of herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. In this episode, we will be discussing some more of the basic Chinese medical pulses including the first six basic pulses: slow and fast, empty, full, floating, and deep. Please join us as we learn about Apple of Sodom or Calotropis procera.

Mi Meng Hua (Buddleia Flower Bud)

This episode will cover another Chinese herb Mi Meng Hua (Buddleia flower bud). Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. In this episode we will start our conversation about the Chinese medical pulse. Please join us as we learn about Mi Meng Hua (Buddleia flower bud)!

Supporting and Releasing Formulas

This episode will cover one of the traditional categories of formulas, Supporting and Releasing Formulas. Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including the formulas in the category, and common functions, we will explore the science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of the category of formulas. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. In this episode we talk about the Warring States Period in Chinese history and the foundational text of Chinese medicine, the Huáng Dì Nèi Jīng (Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon). Please join us as we learn about the Supporting and Releasing Formulas!

Fang Feng (Saposhnikovia or Siler Root)

This episode covers the Chinese herb Fang Feng (Saposhnikovia or Siler Root), used to treat bones and sinews as well as yang vacuity. Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. In this episode, finally, we will be doing a pretty deep dive into Daoism, one of the the most important philosphies unerpinning Chinese medicine . Please join us as we learn about Fang Feng (Saposhnikovia or Siler Root).

Eremophila longifolia

This episode covers the Australian herb Eremophila longifolia commonly known as berrigan. This Aboriginal herb is something I know very little about and am super excited for you to join me on a journey to learn about it. As usual, we will go into great depth about it covering the basics of herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. On this episode, we will discuss the pharmacological concept of bioavailability. Please join us as we take a journey down under to learn about Eremophila longifolia.

Gu Sui Bu (Drynaria Rhizome)

This episode covers the Chinese herb Gu Sui Bu (Drynaria Rhizome), used to treat bones and sinews as well as yang vacuity. Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode. This episode discusses epigenetics and its potential to explain some mechanisms of action for acupuncture and herbal interventions. Please join us as we learn about Gu Sui Bu (Drynaria Rhizome).

Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Fruit)

This episode covers the Chinese herb Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Fruit). This is a relatively commonly used Chinese herb. Besides covering the basics of herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode: we will be looking at another classic of Chinese literature: the Bing Fa or The Art of War. Please join us as we learn about the important Chinese herb: Wu Wei Zi (Schisandra Fruit).

Sumac (Rhus coriaria)

This episode covers the herb Sumac. This is a delicious middle eastern and African spice, but does it have medicinal properties? Spoiler alert: it does have medicinal properties and we are going to explore them with our usual thoroughness. Besides covering the basics of herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, quality, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode: the foundational and very important Yi Jing or Book of Changes. Please join us as we learn about this herb/spice/medicine, Sumac!

Formulas that Release Exterior Wind-Cold

This episode covers one of the traditional categories of formulas, Formulas that Release Exterior Wind-Cold. These formulas are incredibly important for treating specific types the everyday cold and flu. Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including the formulas in the category, and common functions, we will explore the science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of this category of formulas. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode: we are going to talk about one the greatest Chinese physicians, Zhāng Zhòng-Jǐng, and his famous and foundational book, Shang Han Za Bing Lun (On Cold Damage and Miscellaneous Diseases). Please join us as we learn about this important category of formulas!

Bei Mu Gua Lou San (Fritillaria and Trichosanthis Fruit Powder)

This episode covers the Chinese formula Bei Mu Gua Lou San (Fritillaria and Trichosanthis Fruit Powder). This formula transforms phlegm by treating qi and helping the organs to do their proper jobs, while also moistening. As usual, we will go into depth about the formula. Besides covering the basics of Chinese herbology including category, and functions, we will explore the history, science, pharmacology, evidence, and any potential interactions of each herb. And then there is always something a little quirky about an episode: we discuss the Chinese origin myth and Pan Gu. Please join us as we learn about Bei Mu Gua Lou San (Fritillaria and Trichosanthis Fruit Powder).